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Affiliation between party committees

State and local committees

A state party committee and local party committees within that state are presumed to be affiliated. That is, all contributions received and made by local party committees count against the state committee’s limits.

This means that the state committee and local committees together may receive a maximum of $10,000 per calendar year from any one individual or non-multicandidate committee contributor. Similarly, the state committee and local committees together may not contribute more than $5,000 to a candidate per election, assuming the state party committee has qualified as a multicandidate committee.

To avoid exceeding the contribution limits, a state party committee should set up a centralized monitoring system to ensure that all contributions made and received by local party committees are within the limits.

Independent local committees

A local party committee may operate under its own separate set of contribution limits if the committee’s independence can be demonstrated. An independent party committee has the same set of contribution limits as a PAC. Thus, for example, an independent local party committee that has multicandidate committee status may contribute up to $5,000 to a federal candidate, while an independent local party committee that is a non-multicandidate committee may contribute up to $2,700 to a federal candidate.

National party committees

A national party committee operates under its own set of contribution limits. Only federally permissible funds may be raised and spent by the national parties. The Democratic and Republican parties each have three national party committees: a national committee, a House campaign committee and a Senate campaign committee. Each of these committees has a separate set of contribution limits, except for a special limit on contributions to Senate campaigns.