News Releases, Media Advisories

For Immediate Release:                                                                                             Contact:  Sharon Snyder
March 1, 2000                                                                                                                            Ron Harris
                                                                                                                                                        Ian Stirton
                                                                                                                                                        Kelly Huff
Corrected March 1, 2000 

 

FEC ANNOUNCES 2000 PRESIDENTIAL SPENDING LIMITS

WASHINGTON -- Presidential candidates who accept public funding may spend $40,536 million on their pre-nomination efforts while each party's nominee will be able to spend $67.56 million during the 2000 general election, according to unofficial calculations released today by the Federal Election Commission.

Each of the two major parties will be able to spend up to $13,680,292 on behalf of their presidential nominees, and $13,512,000 on their conventions, according to these calculations.

There is an overall spending limit for the entire pre-convention period as well as limits for spending in each state. The limits apply only to those campaigns choosing to accept federal funds. Campaigns which forego federal funding may spend unlimited amounts of money.

The overall "base" spending limit for presidential primary campaigns is $10 million, plus a cost-of-living adjustment (over 1974). For the 2000 primary season, the "base" spending limit is $33,780,000. An exemption for 20% of a campaign's fundraising expenses effectively raises the amount primary contenders may spend in the pre-convention period to $40,536,000. In addition, Commission regulations permit campaigns an allowance for legal and accounting costs associated with compliance with the FECA. During the period that the campaign is active, the allowance is 15% of the "base" spending limit or $5,067,000. Once the campaign is over and is winding down, all salary and overhead expenses may be considered exempt compliance in addition to the 15% of the "base" spending limit allowed during the campaign.

State spending limits are keyed to the voting age population of each state, with a minimum of at least $200,000 plus a cost-of-living adjustment for those states with a low VAP. The formula for setting state limits is 16 x VAP + cost-of-living. A less populated state, such as New Hampshire, would have a limit of $200,000, plus cost-of-living, or $675,600. A larger state, such as California, would have a limit of 16 x 24,222,000 (VAP), plus cost-of-living, or $13,091,507.

The two major party nominees will be given $67,560,000 each for the general election campaign. Candidates opting for general election funding have a spending limit of $20 million plus a cost-of-living adjustment, (over 1974). They receive all of their funds from the U.S. Treasury and may not raise private contributions for the campaign, other than for certain legal and accounting costs, which are not subject to the spending limit.

Note to editors/correspondents: The spending limits are, at this time, unofficial until the Labor Department and the Bureau of Census certify the cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) and voting age population (VAP) figures. However, the FEC does not expect the computations to change and committees are being so notified.

 

State-By-State Expenditure Limitations

2000 Presidential Primary Candidates

State

VAP

Expenditure

State

VAP

Expenditure

(in thousands)

Limitation

(in thousands)

Limitation

Alabama

3,304

$1,785,746

New Hampshire

897

$675,600

Alaska

423

$675,600

New Jersey

6,140

$3,318,547

Arizona

3,444

$1,861,413

New Mexico

1,244

$675,600

Arkansas

1,891

$1,022,048

New York

13,756

$7,434,843

California

24,222

$13,091,507

North Carolina

5,710

$3,086,141

Colorado

2,991

$1,616,576

North Dakota

474

$675,600

Connecticut

2,454

$1,326,338

Ohio

8,413

$4,547,058

Delaware

571

$675,600

Oklahoma

2,476

$1,338,228

DC

424

$675,600

Oregon

2,489

$1,345,255

Florida

11,541

$6,237,680

Pennsylvania

9,141

$4,940,528

Georgia

5,731

$3,097,491

Rhode Island

750

$675,600

Hawaii

896

$675,600

South Carolina

2,930

$1,583,606

Idaho

901

$675,600

South Dakota

535

$675,600

Illinois

8,947

$4,835,675

Tennessee

4,143

$2,239,209

Indiana

4,414

$2,385,679

Texas

14,325

$7,742,376

Iowa

2,150

$1,162,032

Utah

1,422

$768,563

Kansas

1,955

$1,056,638

Vermont

454

$675,600

Kentucky

2,995

$1,618,738

Virginia

5,208

$2,814,820

Louisiana

3,182

$1,719,807

Washington

4,270

$2,307,850

Maine

963

$675,600

West Virginia

1,403

$758,293

Maryland

3,862

$2,087,334

Wisconsin

3,902

$2,108,953

Massachusetts

4,707

$2,544,039

Wyoming

353

$675,600

Michigan

7,303

$3,947,125

Minnesota

3,504

$1,893,842

Mississippi

2,016

$1,089,608

Missouri

4,069

$2,199,213

Montana

659

$675,600

Nebraska

1,222

$675,600

Nevada

1,318

$712,353

US Territories:

American Samoa

$675,600

Guam

$675,600

Puerto Rico

$675,600

Virgin Islands

$675,600